How to Bridge the gap between Client and Web Developer

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Just like running a restaurant, you have to create your signature recipe, provide the best customer service and also know what your customer wants. Operating a web designing and development company is no different. Far from the loose t-shirt and the jeans with nerdy glasses and headphones stating “I’m a cool guy”, web developers hold dear to their flexibility to juggle the demanding task of building websites that please their client, the target customer and of course, themselves.

How your mind is different from your client?

Developers actually breathe in and breathe out codes, the likes of JavaScript, Python, CSS etcetera. Your concerns should include the performance of the web app; if everything and every link are functioning as they should be, usability issues, right designs, graphics, colours and so much more.

On the other hand, your clients want an elegant site or app to represent their company to the virtual world. They regularly check on their competitor’s products and services to keep them parallel to the market. They know and understand their customer better than you. Moreover, they are primarily an expert to the products they are selling.

In summary, you are hired to do their work because you are an expert in web development, on the other hand, they have mastered the in and out of their business. Both of you are experts but in a different field.

Negotiating with your clients

What you must always understand whenever you are talking to your clients is that you are the mediator and negotiator. Thereby you have to entertain your client’s suggestion for the website/app and always listen to the specifics and not leaving out any detail of what their brand is about. However, you must also know firmly what would work best not just what they like. You must discern which works best for the both of you to arrive at a consensus.

For example, your client may demand you to place a more prominent logo on their site/app; you have to let it out by telling the client that it may be suitable for the app/site and make sure to back your words with research explaining which things must be emphasised. It is also your task to educate them on the trends in e-commerce websites.

You are not only hired to fulfil their requirements but also to do your craft. Raising an argument will do you no harm. It also gives an impression to your client that you are indeed an expert in what you do and that you genuinely care about the project as much as he does. However, there will also be some instances where you have to wag your tail down and bend on their demands. Thus, negotiation will always leave both parties anxious to agree than to disagree. But what can’t be fixed through good communication?

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